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AR2827

About Higher
Horizons

 

Higher Horizons Observatory is located in Wasilla, Alaska, U.S.A.

Under the dome is an equatorially mounted 10" Newtonian reflector that is used for nighttime observing and star parties.

The observatory also operates a 5" refractor that is equipped for observing and photographing the Sun. 

 

Projects

Higher Horizons Observatory participates in solar research projects.  Data is gathered, analyzed, and then submitted to the CV-Helios Worldwide Solar Observation Network and the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers Solar Section.

Each spring, I take the solar telescope into the Anchorage Museum on International Astronomy Day to share views of the Sun with everyone there.

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Here's a little something just for fun.  Heavens Above hosts a website where you can find information about when a given satellite will pass overhead at your particular location.  Most satellites are bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye and look like moving stars.

You can use this site to see when the International Space Station will be visible from your back yard for example.  Have fun with it!

Higher Horizons Observatory is located in Wasilla, Alaska, U.S.A.

Under the dome is an equatorially mounted 10" Newtonian reflector that is used for nighttime observing and star parties.

The observatory also operates a 5" refractor that is equipped for observing and photographing the Sun. 

The last family member is an 8" Schmidt-Cass that is used for solar and nighttime observing when high maginification is required. 

 

 

 

 

Here's something just for fun:  Most Earth-orbiting satellites are visible to the unaided eye as moving stars.  The Heavens Above website has information about when any particular satellite will be visible from your backyard.  You can watch the International Space Station pass overhead for example.  

Check it out:

Heavens-Above

 

 

Higher Horizons Observatory participates in solar research projects.  Data is gathered, analyzed, and then submitted to the CV-Helios Worldwide Solar Observation Network and the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers Solar Section.

Tom is a NASA Solar System Ambassador.  The Solar System Ambassadors (SSA) program is run by NASA/JPL/Caltech.  It is comprised of dedicated, trained volunteers across the nation that share the latest science and discoveries of NASA's missions through a variety of events designed to inspire their communities.

There is more about the Solar System Ambassador program on the PUBLIC OUTREACH button at the top of this page.

 

CV-Helios World Wide Solar Observing Network

www.CV-Helios.net

Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers

www.alpo-astronomy.org

Current space weather conditions

Space Weather Enthusiasts Dashboard | NOAA / NWS Space Weather Prediction Center

 

Real time solar wind

https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/products/real-time-solar-wind

Current Active Regions (Sunspots)

Solar activity | SpaceWeatherLive.com 

Big Bear Solar Observatory

http://www.bbso.njit.edu/

National Solar Observatory

https://www.nso.edu/

NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory

https://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/

NASA Parker Solar Probe

http://parkersolarprobe.jhuapl.edu/

Southcentral Alaska Astronomical Society

https://akastro.org

Solar Conditions as of 5:40 AM Alaska Time 06/12/2024

There are seven sunspots visible on the solar disk today.  AR3703 has rotated over the western edge of the Sun.  Please click on the "THE SOLAR CYCLE" button in the header for more information regarding sunspots and the solar cycle.

Solar wind:                                                            Planetary K-index:                                                     Interplanetary Magnetic Field:

     -  357.9 km/sec (798,832.8 mi/hr)                      - Current Kp = 1 (quiet)                                              - Bt =  4.42 nT

     -  3.38 protons per cubic cm                              - Max over last 24 hrs Kp = 2 (quiet)                        - Bz =  -3.83 nT south

The images below were captured by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO).  The SDO orbits the Earth in such a path that it has a complete view of the Sun at all times.

HMI provides four main types of data: dopplergrams (maps of solar surface velocity), continuum filtergrams (broad-wavelength photographs of the solar photosphere), and both line-of-sight and vector magnetograms (maps of the photospheric magnetic field). 

New spots!

The photo to the right was taken by the AIA camera aboard the SDO.  The AIA camera is the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly.  AIA images the solar atmosphere in multiple wavelengths to link changes in the surface to changes in the interior. Data includes images of the Sun in 10 wavelengths every 10 seconds.  

The dark areas in this image are called "coronal holes".  Coronal holes are areas where the Sun's magnetic field opens up and allows "solar wind" - charged particles - to escape into space. 

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The University of Oulu's Neutron Monitor Database website: https://cosmisrays.oulu.fi/

CONTACT HIGHER HORIZONS OBSERVATORY

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Higher Horizons Observatory

Wasilla, Alaska, U.S.A.

 

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